Nuggets

Charlie Munger on finding one’s special advantages

26 Dec 2020 · via A Conversation with Distinguished Alumnus Charles T. Munger 🎥


In a recent interview (14 Dec 2020), the 96-year-old sage Charlie Munger talked about career decisions, including the circumstances around his own decisions and the lessons that he has learned.

If I were forced to compress his remarks into a paragraph, it would be along the lines of:

You ought to know that, first and foremost, most careers involve tough competition. If you seek to win big, you must get to know what your special advantages are. How? By following your interests and seeking direct feedback from hands-on experiences. The earlier, the better, because it may take decades. After you discover your advantages, go fish where they can be well applied. And, very importantly, keep an eye on the tailwinds — the wind might help you when it blows hard.

What follows is the transcript in verbatim of his comments and advice on career (I simply came up with a few topics to reorder and organize the content).

Enjoy!

On spotting someone with special advantages on something:

When I was at Caltech I took this course of Thermodynamics from Homer Joe Stewart — by the way, a lovely human being and gifted beyond compare. And one thing I learned from him was that no matter how hard I would try, I could never be as good at Thermodynamics as Homer Joe Stewart.

I think that is a very useful lesson, I knew what I could do and I couldn't. I never even considered trying to compete with the Homer Joe Stewarts of the world in Thermodynamics.

On how competitive professional life is (if you are looking to get far ahead):

Just think of how hard it is to get far ahead in life. Suppose you want to get ahead at Caltech, you like the academic life. If you want it, Caltech is very good at getting people tenure. If you’re very brilliant and work 80-90 hours a week for 9-10 years, you get tenure. That is not what I call an easy life. And competing with the Homer Joe Stewarts!

I chose to avoid it because I knew I wouldn’t win big at it. [Of course I could have been] a perfectly successful professor by ordinary standards, but I would not have been a star.

On starting a carreer in law. I guess that he arrived at it because, at the time, he haven’t realized yet what he was particularly good at:

My father had gone to the Harvard Law School, and my grandfather was a distinguished judge in Nebraska. So that was a natural course of activity for me.

I went into law because I didn’t want to be a surgeon, I didn’t want to be a doctor, I didn’t want to be a college professor. I finally got through them, there was only one, I just went down the family path. And it wasn’t the wisest decision I ever ran.

On switching from law to investing. His career change happened after he did investing on the side for a decade or so and came out fairly good at it:

There were things I didn’t like about law practice, but I had an army of children to support, and no family money or anything to start with. So I had to make my way in life for this army of children.

What happened was: my pitifully small earnings as a young man I kept underspending them, and I kept investing fairly boldly and fairly smartly. And at the end of my first 13 years of law practice I had more liquid investments than I made in all those years of law practice pre-tax.

I’d done that [my liquid investments] in my spare time with these little tiny sums. So it was natural for me, partly prompted by Warren Buffett’s success, to think I should just start working for myself instead of for other people. [If I had done that] in my spare time, I thought, “Well, what will happen if I do it full time?”

On how tailwinds help everyone. It doesn’t matter your special advantage (in fact, one may have none to count on). Nor does it matter if you trying to win big:

If you go into a career that’s very tough, you’re not going to do very well. And if you go into one where you have special advantages and you like the work, you’re going to do pretty well.

Moderator: So finding your own path is something you really recommend to everyone?

No! What I recommend to everyone — what helps everyone — is to get into something that’s going up and it just carries you along without much talent or work. If you pick a really strong place like, say, Costco, and you go to work at it, and you really are reliable and nice, you’re going to do fine in life. You’ve got a big tailwind.

But in elite education nobody wants to go to work for Costco from Harvard or MIT or Stanford. And, of course, it’s the one place where it would where be the easiest to get ahead.

On how hard it is to teach special advantages in poker or chess or investing for everyone. People seem to “embody” their special advantages, as if they had the perfect temperament for a given activity. Things are suppose to “click” and come “naturally”:

If you asked, “How could Caltech teach people how to win chess tournaments or poker tournaments?” You would find that some people at Caltech are very good at that, and others aren’t. And if you want to win at those things, you better bet on the people that are really very good at it, and not everybody is.

I don’t think Caltech can make great investors out of most people. I think great investors to some extent are like great chess players. They’re almost born to be investors.

Moderator: Because of the tolerance for risk? The patience? What are the traits?

Obviously you have to know a lot.

But partly it’s temperament, partly it’s deferred gratification. You got to be willing to wait. Good investing requires a weird combination of patience and aggression, and not many people have it.

It [also] requires a big amount of self-awareness — how much you know and how much you don’t know. You have to know the edge of your own competency, and a lot of brilliant people are no good at knowing the edge of their own competency. They think they’re way smarter than they are. Of course that’s dangerous and causes trouble.

So I think Caltech would have a hard time teaching everybody to be a great investor.

Moderator: Could it help people discover that they have that temperament? Or is this something that you mostly should try on your own?

I think you find out whether you got the qualities to win at poker by playing poker.

Moderator: That’s a very empirical approach, Charlie.

Yes, but I think it’s right.

Obviously it helps to know the basic math of Fermat and Pascal but everybody [in a sense] knows that stuff.

But having the temperament, where Fermat and Pascal is the most part of you, where it is your ear and nose, that’s a different kind of a person. And I think it’s hard to teach that.

Warren and I have talked about this. In the early days, we talked about our way of doing things, which [was] working so well. We found [that] some people got it, and that they instantly converted our way, and did very well. And some people, no matter how carefully we explained it, and no matter how successful they were, they could never adapt it. [People] either got it fast or they didn’t get it at all. That’s my experience.

So how are we supposed to find the special advantages that one might have? Charlie wasn’t asked this question, but he did offer a comment that sort of touches on that:

If you pursue any career with enough fanaticism, that’s very likely to work better than not having the fanaticism. So, if you look at Warren Buffett, he had this fanatic interest in investments from an early age. And he kept making small investments, even with his [tiny little] savings [at the time], and he finally learned how to be pretty good at it. And so if you want to succeed in investments, start early, try hard, and keep doing it. All success comes that way by and large.

My understanding is that there are activities where feedback is faster and easier to get than others. Munger himself needed 13 years figure out that investing was the thing that he liked and was good at. Apparently, if he were not born in the same town as Buffett, it could had taken him longer.

In fact, in some parallel universe, there may be a Charlie Munger who had never made the move and is still a lawyer. That Charlie is certainly less happy with work than the investor that inhabits our planet. But such is life.


In Towards Greatness
Tagged with Charlie Munger · Career



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